Posts Tagged ‘social media’
Apr 11

Facebook page statistics is a gold mine of information when it comes to social media marketing. Unfortunately, not everyone except the admin would be able to access the statistics of a facebook page. But now, its possible to find out the demographics and statistics of any facebook page (almost) easily.

The new tool that let’s you do it is called LikeAudience. It lets you do two things.

One – It lets you search facebook pages by demographic. For instance, if you’re searching for pages where females, within the age range of 20-25, who’re generally happy flock, then you can tweak these settings, and search giving you the list of pages that has a matching profile of members.

Facebook Statistics Page

Facebook Statistics Page

his is a great tool for brands to fish out target audience (if it works well that is). As of now there seems to be a database of facebook pages and their user statistics, so the data we get while searching is not 100% accurate.

Article from Daily Bloggr

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Mar 11

Facebook as an advertising platform can be difficult for some marketers to wrap their heads around. If there is no literal “interest” in Facebook’s targeting interface some marketers will wipe their hands of the platform and declare, “My customers aren’t on Facebook” and go back to AdWords and AdCenter. #facepalm.

Facebook Targeting

Facebook Targeting

One group of people marketers would love to get their ads in front of are the affluent. There is no way to target strictly job titles, incomes, or property values on Facebook unless you think outside the box.

First, think about what Facebook asks the users to disclose:

  • Where you live
  • Education
  • Workplace
  • Religion
  • Political Views
  • People Who Inspire You
  • Favorite Games
  • Sports you Play
  • Sports Teams
  • Athletes
  • Activities/Hobbies
  • Interests
  • Music
  • Books
  • Movies
  • Television
  • Languages

Identifying what your affluent target market would reveal about themselves when prompted by these questions is the secret sauce.

Article by Merry Morud from Search Engine Watch

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Mar 11

A new report from agency GroupM and comScore details the degree to which search and social media have become intertwined in the purchase path that consumers take across the Internet. The report is a follow-up to a similar study done in 2009.

GroupM and comScore looked at consumer behavior associated with purchase decisions in the electronics/telecommunications and consumer packaged goods categories. They found that while search dominates social media among consumers making buying decisions — nearly 60 percent of cases that end in a purchase begin with search – social media play an increasingly important role during consideration and especially after a purchase is made.

The report found that “40 percent of consumers who use search in their path to purchase are motivated to use social media to further their decision making process.”

Click Through Rate

Click Through Rate

Social boosts search CTRs

The phrase “social media” as defined here includes blogs, consumer reviews, YouTube, Twitter and Facebook.

The consumer behavior revealed in the study is complex. However the report supports the idea that social media are now critical for product or brand awareness and drive related, subsequent search behavior. GroupM stated that “when consumers were exposed to both search and social media influenced by a brand that overall search CTR went up by 94 percent.”

As one might expect, the “the top motivation of consumers to use social media in their purchase process is to get other people’s opinion (31 percent).” Almost half of those converting in the study used both search and social media, while the other half used search alone.

Article by Greg Sterling from Search Engine Land

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Jan 11

There are two type of people in this world. One who loves social media, and the other who hates it. There’s no in-betweens. And about brands ? There are the ones who’ve already embraced social media and others who are skeptic about it.

Brand and Social Media

Brand and Social Media

In my opinion, its fair for brands to get skeptic about social media, because of two reasons:

1) There is a lot of uncertainty involved

2) Brands have their image at stake.

Imagine all that marketing talks, discussions, strategies and competition that would’ve gone in all these years to build the brand. One fine morning, social media comes up and you’re talking about change. Change to such volumes that it could even put the brand at threat.

So, brands have all the right to get doubtful about social media. And its fair that they might not understand it in the first go, but education can helps it all.

Brands, have always been following the old-school marketing techniques. They’d extrapolate their ideas and techniques to social media, and expect it to work the same way. They would fail miserably. But that’s when they would either realize that they’ve done something wrong, or realize that this isn’t going to work.

Article from Daily SEO Blog

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Dec 10

Feeling a little overwhelmed this holiday season? Between work, family, avoiding sick co-workers and shopping for gifts, you’ll be glad to know that you can also effectively schedule in some time for social media. Great. More stuff to add to your list!

Always start with an objective in mind. Don’t have one? Here’s a list for some helpful ideas. These are some things that you’ll realistically be able to accomplish if you put in the time.

Time for Social Media

Time for Social Media

Article from E Marketed blog

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Dec 10

Arguably, social media marketing for B2B companies is one of the most difficult campaigns to run. On the surface it seems there are more successful B2C social media examples than B2B, but online seems to be where it’s at if you’re looking to market to those B2B decision makers.

B2B in Social Media

B2B in Social Media

Nearly 85 percent of B2B decision makers are online and using social media to help in their decision making, according to Forrester Researchestimates. That’s quite a large number considering offline avenues you have at your disposal can often cost more than social media marketing, and offer fewer success metrics to prove return on investment.

The big question here is, however, does a B2B social media marketing campaign actually work? What better way to examine whether it does than with examples?

Article by Kaila Strong from Search Engine Watch.

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Nov 10

First off, what are today’s Social Media campaign trends? What makes a social media campaign? Even better, what is a social media campaign?
Very often, when somebody decides to market their product online, be it a FMCG product or an online service, they start to think about online marketing like your regular marketing efforts. Which is to put in your money, milk your resources, push your product to as much people as you can in the earliest possible time period.
Is this a wrong approach? Hell no. How could it be wrong when marketers have been successful at this time and again?
The truth is, this strategy isn’t wrong but, it possibly isn’t the best one, you could’ve used.
Online marketing is no longer about trying to engage your “audience”. And social media is no longer a marketing tool for your product.

Successful Social Media Campaign

Successful Social Media Campaign

I wish it was, in fact it might have been for some time (and also even now), but the fact is that it isn’t working and we’re still in a transition period, learning new things, experimenting newer strategies, and learning from mistakes.
So, what are social media campaigns?
They’re not any longer your average, on the face advertising, not even are they about “engaging customers” through social media channels, and most definitely, social media campaigns aren’t about using a set of tool like facebook and twitter – just because they are available.

Social Media Campaigns today are about creating experiences. Rich, memorable and engaging experiences.
I’m not trying to say that they aren’t about brands or selling. No, they are indeed about “selling stuff online”, but we’ve evolved, we’ve learned from our mistakes, we’ve gotten clever and we’re no longer in the era of persuasive buying. We’ve moved on to a new era of experiences and relationships.

We buy what we like, not what we actually need. We share, because we enjoy, not because you were asked to.

Now, where does this bring us? Does it make online marketing easy?

I think not. It has moved up further more levels, and things could get complicated if you don’t understand or try and learn about the environment.

Article from Daily SEO Blog

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Jul 10

Wait, first – who do you think is an influential guy ?

If my guess is right, most people think that the person with the most number of followers is. Technically, I can’t disagree. Obviously the more you have the merrier.

But study shows that the number game isn’t really what it is. Its beyond numbers.

Companies measure influence in social media by metrics like engagement value, carrier value, message reach and community influence and most importantly credibility.

Hmm, that’s a tough game altogether right ?

I think I agree to it. Its definitely got to be beyond the numbers.

Article from Daily SEO Blog

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Jun 10

Okay, engagement is cliché, forget about it. Think of it this way. If you’re a website / product / service owner, how would you measure success with engagement on social media ? One often repeated factor is social media engagement. Build a community around your site on social media, and if you can retain the community with a good chunk of loyal folks, you’re half way through.

Once you create a community, you could do anything with it. Sell stuff, branch out to different levels, you could diversify to different products – anything. The community remains the core.

But that’s easily said than done. Building a community is most important as well as most difficult.

Article fron Daily SEO Blog.

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