Posts Tagged ‘google’
Mar 11

We talk all the time about keywords. When the search engine marketing industry talks about keywords, you’ll frequently hear the terms “head,” “torso,” and “tail” to describe the amount of volume that each of the keywords receive.

Head terms are the high volume, more generic and competitive terms. Tail terms are just the opposite.

Conversion Rate Optimization

Conversion Rate Optimization

I’ve recently had a lot of internal and external conversations around the value of the keyword spectrum. We’re asking ourselves:

  • Has Google Instant killed the long tail?
  • Do head terms provide brand awareness, and feed tail traffic?
  • At what point are you done building keywords, and exhaust the long tail?

In order to answer some of these questions I dove into some keyword level data for our clients, and found some interesting stuff.

CTR by Keyword Phrase

Most would broadly define what is a head or tail term by the number of words contained within the keyword phrase. The general thought is you should see a higher CTR when there are more keywords in the phrase because it’s more descriptive.

I took data from two different clients (both one name companies), and plotted out the CTR by word count per keyword phrase. In the first example I included both branded and unbranded terms, and in the second example included only branded terms.

Article by Jason Tabeling Form Search Engine Watch

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Mar 11

Almost 5 percent of paid search spending in the US is now in mobile, according to a report released last week from banking and investment firm Macquarie Group, using Efficient Frontier data. That mobile search spend could double to almost 10 percent by the end of this year if growth continues at an aggressive pace.

Using some very rough math that would mean US mobile paid search could be worth approximately $1.1 billion (at least) by the end of 2011. And almost all that money would be Google’s.

Google Market rate Paid search on mobile

Google Market rate Paid search on mobile

Just as Google dominates mobile search share in the US (with roughly 98 percent), the report said that 97 percent of mobile search spend (for Efficient Frontier clients) now goes to Google, while 3.2 percent spend goes to Bing/Yahoo.

Article by Greg Sterling from Search Engine Land

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Mar 11

A new report from agency GroupM and comScore details the degree to which search and social media have become intertwined in the purchase path that consumers take across the Internet. The report is a follow-up to a similar study done in 2009.

GroupM and comScore looked at consumer behavior associated with purchase decisions in the electronics/telecommunications and consumer packaged goods categories. They found that while search dominates social media among consumers making buying decisions — nearly 60 percent of cases that end in a purchase begin with search – social media play an increasingly important role during consideration and especially after a purchase is made.

The report found that “40 percent of consumers who use search in their path to purchase are motivated to use social media to further their decision making process.”

Click Through Rate

Click Through Rate

Social boosts search CTRs

The phrase “social media” as defined here includes blogs, consumer reviews, YouTube, Twitter and Facebook.

The consumer behavior revealed in the study is complex. However the report supports the idea that social media are now critical for product or brand awareness and drive related, subsequent search behavior. GroupM stated that “when consumers were exposed to both search and social media influenced by a brand that overall search CTR went up by 94 percent.”

As one might expect, the “the top motivation of consumers to use social media in their purchase process is to get other people’s opinion (31 percent).” Almost half of those converting in the study used both search and social media, while the other half used search alone.

Article by Greg Sterling from Search Engine Land

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Feb 11

Google Inc.’s move last week to lower the search rankings of websites that the company said offer little useful information appears to be having a dramatic impact, according to firms that study search-engine data.

Google has changed its search algorithm in an effort to filter out data from “content farms” in search results. Marcelo Prince, Jessica Vascellaro and Simon Constable discuss how this affect site rankings and revenues for businesses.

Many websites that previously ranked highly in searches for certain keywords on Google dropped sharply following the change in the company’s search algorithms, the firms found. Some of the sites that were hurt defended the quality of their content, arguing that they had been unfairly lumped with bad actors on the Internet.

Meanwhile, some well-known social-networking, retail and news sites emerged as apparent winners, rising in Google’s rankings.

Google has said the change was aimed, among other things, at sites with what it calls “low quality” content: just enough information to appear in search results and lure users to pages loaded with advertisements. It estimated that the new algorithms would affect about 12% of U.S.-based search queries and would expand to non-U.S. queries in the near future.

“It has to be that some sites will go up and some will go down,” Google engineers Amit Singhal and Matt Cutts wrote in a blog post Thursday night. They said sites with original content “such as research, in-depth reports, thoughtful analysis and so on” will move up.

Article by Amir Efrati from The Wall Street Journal

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Feb 11

As Facebook has entered the mainstream marketing mix, marketers are having to decide how much of their budget to divert from other channels into social campaigns.

Because search gets the lion’s share of a digital marketing budget, it might seem like the most likely candidate for a cutback — after all, there’s usually so much of it. But marketers might want to think twice before jumping to that conclusion, because it may very well be a blind leap of faith.

Targeting search vs facebook

Targeting search vs facebook

In the last year alone, the only thing more impressive than Facebook’s growth has been the buzz around it. Users, page views, estimated value, and a Hollywood blockbuster all seem to point to “the next big thing” — something that all marketers should want to be part of.

In reality, Facebook marketing offers a very different value proposition from search marketing, and results-driven marketers can still get a much better return our of search than they can out of social.

Article by Guillaume Bouchard from Search Engine Watch

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Feb 11

Google has run a sting operation that it says proves Bing has been watching what people search for on Google, the sites they select from Google’s results, then uses that information to improve Bing’s own search listings. Bing doesn’t deny this.

As a result of the apparent monitoring, Bing’s relevancy is potentially improving (or getting worse) on the back of Google’s own work. Google likens it to the digital equivalent of Bing leaning over during an exam and copying off of Google’s test.

Bing and Google War

Bing and Google War

“I’ve spent my career in pursuit of a good search engine,” says Amit Singhal, a Google Fellow who oversees the search engine’s ranking algorithm. “I’ve got no problem with a competitor developing an innovative algorithm. But copying is not innovation, in my book.”

Article by Danny Sullivan from Search Engine Land

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Dec 10

It’s that time of year again. SEO bloggers are either looking back at their predictions for 2010 and seeing how right (or wrong) they were, or making entirely new predictions for 2011 — possibly because they were so wrong last year that it wasn’t worth looking back?

I want to focus on just one prediction for 2011 and then go ahead and try to make it happen on behalf of my clients. This seems like a more simple task than coming up with five or 10 predictions, knowing that some of them were made up simply so that I could fill a blog post.

The big news in SEO recently was the revelation that social media signals affect natural search rankings, from interviews with people at both Google and Bing — although no indication was given to how much they affect rankings.

Search Engine Optimisation

Search Engine Optimisation

To be fair, if you were a search engine and wanted to know what brands, websites, and general content people wanted to interact with online, where would you go first? It has an added benefit for those who think that the SERPs are a bit spammy (I’m not one of them, for the record).

One way of reducing the number of arguably lower quality websites would be to look at who the popular brands are in the social media space and try to reward them with more authority.

How can SEOs take advantage of what seems to be a clear shift toward sentiment as an extra factor in achieving better rankings?

A growing number of SEO techniques can be undertaken with SEO, and specifically link building, in mind — from PR and advertorials to advertising on relevant industry websites.

In 2011, I expect this to become more closely tied with clients’ overall marketing campaigns. The best way to explain this is with an example:

Client A is a retailer, looking to boost sales of a specific range of camping equipment products. Special offers, promotions, and TV advertising is all planned and will revolve around a creative execution involving a character who will appear in their ads.

Article by Gareth Owen from Search Engine Watch.

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Dec 10

Looking for the Wikileaks website? Having lost one domain, and having its second site going down temporarily, it’s a challenge, even for the search engines.

Where’s Wikileaks?

Yesterday, I wrote about how Google was still listing the old address for Wikileaks — wikileaks.org — in a search for wikileaks:

Wikileaks Google Search

Wikileaks Google Search

Where’s Wikileaks?

Yesterday, I wrote about how Google was still listing the old address for Wikileaks — wikileaks.org — in a search for wikileaks:

Wikileaks Google Search

Wikileaks Google Search

That “Cable Viewer” listing, with a description written in French and the strange number rather than a domain name? That’s Wikileaks — not the home page, but at least a key section of the site that’s in the news right now.

Note: When I originally wrote this story, I missed that Wikileaks was listed at all at its new location. About two hours later, I noticed my mistake. I’ve since adjusted the headline of this article, which was, “Why You Can’t Yet Find The New Wikileaks Site On Google.” I added the screenshot above and made a few changes to explain the difference between its new domain name and that number that’s showing up. Read on….

Article Danny Sullivan from Search Engine Land

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Nov 10

New AdWords features such as Product ads, Sitelinks and Click-to-call allow you to create more interactive ads. Product ads and Sitelinks help customers find the most relevant pages on your website and Click-to-call allows customers to call your business directly from the search results.

As ads become more interactive, you might want to know how they’ll impact your business’s key metrics like clicks, click-through-rates and, most importantly, conversions.

To help answer this question, we’ve added a new report to your AdWords account that allows you to measure the performance of each click type you’re using. You can think of a click type as how your customers interact with your ads. Did they click on the headline, a sitelink, or some other aspect of your ad?

You can access the new click type report in the Campaign, Ad groups or Keywords tabs. Select “Segment” then “Click type.

Google ad Segment

Google ad Segment

Article by Nathania Lozada from Inside AdWords crew

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Oct 10

One of the great challenges with search engine optimization (SEO) is getting people to understand what is involved in obtaining links to a web site. Too many times, they expect that an SEO will “just go get links,” without involving any investments of marketing time, development time, or cash (collectively, the “internal resources”).

The problem: it just doesn’t work that way. Website publishers must expect to be integrally involved in the process. If they aren’t, it will result in a bad link building campaign. Let’s look at a few different ways that an SEO could attempt to independently acquire links, and discuss the flaws with each.

Abstract model of Backlinks

Abstract model of Backlinks

Article by Eric Enge from Search Engine Watch

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